Craving sugar? These 5 spices can help you curb your sweet tooth

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Written By Omph impha

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A sugar overload can do more harm than good. A nutrition experts urges you to try out these spices that curb sugar cravings for good!

It is natural for us to reach out to that box of tasty sugary treats if and when our taste buds demand us. Partaking a sweet dish feels rewarding because it’s fun to cheat in between and treat your taste buds with something sweet. You must be thinking why do we crave sugar so much? Food sensitivities, bouts of long stress, feelings of loneliness, imbalance in blood sugar levels, or even fluctuations in the hormones can leave us craving the sweet stuff. However, going overboard on sweet dishes might not be the best decision. High sugar can result in serious health conditions like obesity, heart disease, type-2 diabetes, imbalanced hormones, low mood, or even anxiety. Not to forget, sugar is highly addictive. So, if you wish yourself good health in the long run, you might want to cut down on your sugar intake. Turns out that certain spices can help you curb sugar cravings!

What causes sugar cravings?

When we feed our body with sugar, there is a spike in the secretion of the neurotransmitter serotonin (the feel-good hormone) in the brain. Alongside, beta-endorphins (our natural painkillers) give a feeling of well-being, amp up our self-esteem and also help settle anxiety. That is why digging into that box of sugary treats feels just so good.

Also, the lack of magnesium in our body is one of the main culprits behind our never-ending want for sugar. So, you can level up on the consumption of magnesium-rich foods like dark chocolate, spinach, avocado, pumpkin seeds, etc.

Sugar cravings often lead to binge eating and will surely make you put on weight.

5 spices to curb sugar cravings

Curbing sugar cravings can be challenging, especially with the prevalence of sugar-laden sweets and snacks that are popular in Indian cuisine. However, traditional Indian spices have been known to reduce these cravings. As per dietitian and clinical nutritionist Dr Ushakiran Sisodia, the following are certain spices to reduce sugar cravings:

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1. Cinnamon

Cinnamon, also called dalchini in India, is known to stabilise blood sugar levels by imitating the activity of insulin and increase glucose transport into cells.

2. Fenugreek seeds

Fenugreek seeds aka methi seeds contain an amino acid that can stimulate the release of insulin. The ideal way is to soak them overnight and consume in the morning, or grind them into a powder and add them to curries and dals..

Ginger health benefits
Ginger regulates blood sugar and reduces cravings due to its flavor. Image courtesy: Adobe stock

3. Ginger

Ginger or adrak regulates blood sugar and reduces cravings due to its flavour. They are also a popular addition to morning teas.

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Also read: Did you know brushing after a meal can curb sugar cravings? Sweet!

4. Clove

Cloves have shown to improve the function of insulin and to lower glucose concentration in the blood. It can be added to rice dishes, curries, or even teas.

5. Cardamom

Cardamom is a popular aromatic spice with a distinct flavour and is effective in curbing sugar cravings. Add it to your tea, desserts, or even rice dishes.

It is to be noted that spices should be added to your diet along with whole grains, lean proteins, healthy fats, and lots of fruits and vegetables for a wholesome, non-sugary meal. If you notice an allergy or reaction to any of these spices, consult with your nutritionist immediately.

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