Dangers of an allergic reaction | Gesundheit-Aktuell.de

Photo of author
Written By Kampretz Bianca

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur pulvinar ligula augue quis venenatis. 

Different organ systems, such as the skin, respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract and cardiovascular system, can be affected at the same time. The signs and symptoms of this allergic reaction can occur very quickly and suddenly, within minutes to a few hours after exposure to the allergen, and in severe cases can be fatal. Rapid deterioration of the condition leading to the development of life-threatening symptoms are characteristics of anaphylaxis. Therefore, anaphylaxis should be classified as a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment.

The most common allergy triggers include:

  • Food: Nuts, milk, eggs, fish, shellfish or soy are the most important triggers of anaphylactic reactions. But basically almost any food can trigger anaphylaxis.
  • Insect venoms: Toxins transmitted by stings from wasps, bees, hornets or hornets, for example, are potent allergens and common anaphylactic triggers.
  • Medication: Prescription and over-the-counter medications, such as antibiotics, pain relievers, anesthesia, or x-ray contrast media, are known to trigger anaphylaxis.

Other triggers can be natural latex or other animal and plant allergens that can increase the reaction;

The most dangerous allergic reactions affect the respiratory tract (respiratory arrest) and/or the cardiovascular system (drop in blood pressure, cardiac arrest). A main criterion for anaphylaxis is that not just one of the symptoms can be observed, but several at the same time. The first signs begin with itching in the palms and soles of the feet or genitals, a metallic taste, tingling in the mouth and throat, as well as a feeling of heat or flushing, restlessness and redness in large areas of the skin. Mild symptoms include rash, swelling of the lips, eyes and face, headache, cough and shortness of breath, to severe symptoms such as shortness of breath, a sharp drop in blood pressure, loss of consciousness or respiratory arrest.

Unfortunately, there is no specific test to test an individual’s risk of developing serious allergic reactions. However, a diagnosis made by a specialist helps to identify the trigger and create an individual therapeutic plan. To do so, the allergist will take a detailed anamnesis (discussion of the medical history). Methods such as skin tests and/or blood tests for IgE antibodies are also available. Provocation tests are carried out on foods after an unclear anamnesis to confirm the allergic reaction or are used to test the individual threshold value.

If you think you are having anaphylaxis, act immediately:

Use the emergency kit, which consists of four medications such as antihistamine juice/drops, cortisone juice/drops, epinephrine auto-injector, and asthma spray. Seek medical help and lie down with your legs elevated.

Source link

Leave a Comment

MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf MrSf