How an app can help you to cut down on drinking alcohol by two units a week

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Written By Rivera Claudia

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Tracking your drinking on an app could help you cut your alcohol by two units a week, scientists say. 

Researchers at UCL said their Drink Less app, which is available to download for free on Apple devices, can help people who are high-risk drinkers. 

Their study, involving more than 5,000 people, found those randomly recommended to use the Drink Less app reduced their drinking by 39 units a week at six months.

This was equivalent to two fewer units a week on average when compared to a control group who were referred to standard NHS advice. 

Women were found to benefit more from the app, according to the research, many of whom reduced their drinking by an additional 2.5 units a week, when compared to those who were referred to the NHS advice webpage. 

Researchers at UCL said their Drink Less app, which is available to download for free on Apple devices, can help people who are high-risk drinkers (Stock Image) 

The experts said that while an extra two units a week may seem small, the outcomes can be significant, ‘both in terms of preventing potential health harms as well as reducing costs to the NHS’. 

Lead author Dr Melissa Oldham, of the UCL Institute of Epidemiology and Health Care, said: ‘Alcohol consumption can lead to many health conditions such as cancer and cardiovascular disease. 

‘About 20 per cent of the adult population in the UK drink alcohol at levels that increase their risk of ill health and the Drink Less app could help these people to cut down.’ 

The NHS recommends people should not drink more than 14 units of alcohol a week, spread across three days or more. That is around six medium (175ml) glasses of wine, or six pints of 4% beer. 

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