How only 10% of all cancers are in adults under 50 but experts warn of an ‘epidemic’ of disease in young adults after Kate Middleton’s shock diagnosis

Photo of author
Written By Rivera Claudia

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur pulvinar ligula augue quis venenatis. 

com com com com com com com

Just one in ten cancers are diagnosed in under-50s but cases are on the rise, data shows.

Reacting to Kate Middleton’s shock diagnosis, experts today warned of an ongoing ‘epidemic’ of the disease among younger people. 

However, they said a combination of catching the disease early and better treatments is resulting in improved survival rates.

The Princess of Wales, 42, bravely revealed doctors had discovered an unspecified form of cancer in tests taken after her abdominal surgery. 

In an emotional video message filmed at Windsor, Kate revealed the news had come as a ‘huge shock’ and that she and William ‘have been doing everything we can to process and manage this privately for the sake of our young family’.

More than 375,000 cases of cancer are detected every year in Britain, the equivalent of 1,000 each day, according to Cancer Research UK.

In a video message released today, Kate said she was advised by her medical team to undergo a course of preventative chemotherapy. ‘This of course came as a huge shock, and William and I have been doing everything we can to process and manage this privately for the sake of our young family,’ she added

Catherine's emotional and extraordinary words in her unprecedented video message

Catherine’s emotional and extraordinary words in her unprecedented video message

UK figures suggest those aged 25 to 49 contribute to around a tenth (9 per cent) of new cases, with almost twice as many women than men in some age groups.

More than a third (36 per cent) of new cancer cases on average are in people aged 75 and over.

Adults aged 50 to 75, meanwhile, account for more than half (54 per cent) of all new cases.

Cancers of the breast, prostate, lung and bowel make-up the overwhelming majority of new diagnoses, accounting for around half in total. 

Dr Shivan Sivakumar, an oncologist at the University of Birmingham, said: ‘There is an epidemic currently of young people getting cancer — under 50s.

‘It is unknown the cause of this.’

Professor Andrew Beggs, a consultant colorectal surgeon based at the University of Birmingham, said: ‘Young onset cancer is by no means rare. 

‘I run a clinic for early-onset cancer in adults and we are seeing more and more people in their 40s with cancer.’

Professor Lawrence Young, an expert in molecular oncology based at the University of Warwick, added: ‘Cancer survival is generally higher in younger people. 

‘Early diagnosis and better treatments is resulting in improved outcomes, with survival rates doubling in the last 50 years.’

Figures suggest around one in two people will develop some form of cancer during their lifetime.

According to Cancer Research UK, a third of all cases in the UK are preventable. 

The Princess of Wales’ cancer was discovered only after she underwent major abdominal surgery at The London Clinic in January. 

Kensington Palace has said it will not be sharing details of what kind of cancer the princess has, or what stage of cancer it is and has asked people not to speculate.

In a statement tonight, His Majesty said he is ‘so proud of Catherine for her courage in speaking as she did’ and remains in the ‘closest contact with his beloved daughter-in-law’. 

The Princess of Wales said her family (pictured together on December 25) 'need some time, space and privacy while I complete my treatment'

The Princess of Wales said her family (pictured together on December 25) ‘need some time, space and privacy while I complete my treatment’

The Princess of Wales with her children in her Mother's Day portrait, which now has added significance given her diagnosis

The Princess of Wales with her children in her Mother’s Day portrait, which now has added significance given her diagnosis

The Prince and Princess of Wales were seen together last week as William went to the The Commonwealth Day Service at Westminster Abbey

The Prince and Princess of Wales were seen together last week as William went to the The Commonwealth Day Service at Westminster Abbey

The King and Queen said they ‘will continue to offer their love and support to the whole family through this difficult time’.

Despite the toll cancer takes on the UK, critical NHS targets for the disease, such as those for early diagnosis and treatment, continue to be missed in England. 

The health service is currently grappling with a post-Covid backlog of cancer referrals, with latest NHS data showing more than 10,000 patients did not start cancer treatment within two months of an urgent referral from their GP.

It means just six in 10 cancer patients (62.3 per cent) were seen within the two-month target.

NHS guidelines state 85 per cent of cancer patients should be seen within this time-frame. 

But, this target has not been met nationally since December 2015. 

Just 70.9 per cent of patients urgently referred for suspected cancer were diagnosed or had cancer ruled out within 28 days, down from 74.2 per cent the previous month. The target is 75 per cent.

Kate’s cancer battle in her own words: The Princess of Wales’ emotional video statement in full 

I wanted to take this opportunity to say thank you, personally, for all the wonderful messages of support and for your understanding whilst I have been recovering from surgery.

It has been an incredibly tough couple of months for our entire family, but I’ve had a fantastic medical team who have taken great care of me, for which I am so grateful.

In January, I underwent major abdominal surgery in London and at the time, it was thought that my condition was non-cancerous. The surgery was successful. However, tests after the operation found cancer had been present. My medical team therefore advised that I should undergo a course of preventative chemotherapy and I am now in the early stages of that treatment.

This of course came as a huge shock, and William and I have been doing everything we can to process and manage this privately for the sake of our young family.

As you can imagine, this has taken time. It has taken me time to recover from major surgery in order to start my treatment. But, most importantly, it has taken us time to explain everything to

George, Charlotte and Louis in a way that is appropriate for them, and to reassure them that I am going to be ok.

As I have said to them; I am well and getting stronger every day by focusing on the things that will help me heal; in my mind, body and spirits.

Having William by my side is a great source of comfort and reassurance too. As is the love, support and kindness that has been shown by so many of you. It means so much to us both.

We hope that you will understand that, as a family, we now need some time, space and privacy while I complete my treatment. My work has always brought me a deep sense of joy and I look forward to being back when I am able, but for now I must focus on making a full recovery.

At this time, I am also thinking of all those whose lives have been affected by cancer. For everyone facing this disease, in whatever form, please do not lose faith or hope. You are not alone.

Kate MiddletonSarah Ferguson, Duchess of York

SOURCE

Leave a Comment