Networks and patient training as models of care for the future

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Written By Kampretz Bianca

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Halle/Saale. “Structural change as an opportunity? Sustainable supply in the Central/East region”. Alternating between the speech and the presentation of the project, participants in the new edition of the BMC, held on Tuesday in Halle, tried to find answers to these questions. Professor Lutz Hager, President of the Federal Association of Management Care (BMC), invited people to an interactive exchange. Representatives from the medical profession, pharmaceutical and healthcare companies, health insurance companies and politicians explored what future-proof care means for them and how the path towards it can be paved.

“The times urgently need to change,” said Lutz Hager. Since the BMC first invited people to Halle a year ago, problems in the healthcare system have worsened. But solutions were slow to arrive. “This cannot be satisfactory in the third year of the legislature. Waiting is not an option for us.” His challenge to participants: “Connect everything with everything, experiment, trust people.”

Group resources into networks

Can this work better in healthcare networks? This question was addressed by Dr. Peggy Richter and Dr. Hannes Schlieter from TU Dresden, who examined seven health centers in Germany (Büsum, Eutin, Stettiner Haff, East Saxony, Hochfranken, Kinzigtal and a model from Knappschaft). Their conclusion: most health networks want to pool resources in their region, make care more efficient, have good prevention and digitalization, but also delegate medical tasks.

Treatment pathways, especially for chronic illnesses, facilitate the joint work of different professions. And: “Rural regions are also becoming more attractive to young doctors through networks”, Hannes Schlieter was convinced. The two TU scientists often see bureaucracy and funding problems as difficult obstacles to overcome. New models are often initially accepted and supported only by individual health insurance companies.

Adult education centers invest in continuous training

The Thuringian Adult Education Association addresses benefit recipients with “Power”. “We want to enable patients, regardless of age or education level, to use all services in the healthcare sector without restrictions,” says Fanny Schieber from the Adult Education Center in Weimarer Land, the testing region for additional guidance. to patients. training. “We want to increase the acceptance of digital health applications and promote skills in using these solutions.”

“We are already a little behind the Western Wall,” said Uwe Deh, board member of IKK Gesund Plus, in an interview with Robert-Martin Montag (FDP), the health policy spokesman in the Thuringian state parliament. However, this does not change the fact that Germany has one of the most expensive, but not the best, healthcare systems in the world.

Local actors must shape things

Montag called for local stakeholders to be given more opportunities to shape local health. “Politicians have to take a step back.” In Thuringia, there is a tele-emergency doctor who is connected by the ambulance team and can speak directly to the patient. This builds trust and saves resources at the same time.

At the same time, says Deh, the personal liability of policyholders is a potential that should not be underestimated and cannot be increased by asking questions alone. Montag gives an example: 25% of all inquiries made online are not fulfilled in Thuringia – without consequences. This is unthinkable in the hotel or restaurant industry. Why not also in the health sector?

Talk, have good ideas – the BMC’s goal was achieved in Halle. (zie)

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