Olivia Munn Has an ‘Aggressive’ Breast Cancer That Required a Double Mastectomy

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Written By Rivera Claudia

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Olivia Munn just revealed that she was diagnosed with an “aggressive” and “fast-moving” form of breast cancer, Luminal B, last year that required her to have a double mastectomy.

In an Instagram post on Wednesday, the actor, 43, said she received the diagnosis in April 2023, just months after she had a normal mammogram and underwent a genetic test that screened for 90 different cancer genes—all of which she said she tested negative for, including BRCA. (BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are associated with a higher risk of breast cancer.)

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Even so, her ob-gyn also suggested they look into her Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (BCRAT), or Gail Model, score, which assesses a person’s risk of developing the condition based on various factors like their age, family history, and the age at which they first gave birth. A lifetime risk of at least 20% is considered high—and Munn’s, at 37%, warranted an MRI and biopsy, which revealed she had an aggressive form of cancer called Luminal B in both breasts.

“In the past 10 months, I have had four surgeries, so many days spent in bed I can’t even count, and have learned more about cancer, cancer treatment, and hormones than I ever could have imagined,” Munn wrote. “Surprisingly, I’ve only cried twice. I guess I haven’t felt like there was time to cry. My focus narrowed and I tabled any emotions that I felt would interfere with my ability to stay clear-headed.”

According to the American Cancer Society, the five-year survival rate for breast cancer is 99% if it’s detected early and localized (meaning, it hasn’t spread to other parts of the body). That’s why the CDC highly encourages people to look into their family history of breast cancer if possible—just as Munn did.

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