Tuna fish is a great addition to your menu! Here’s why

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Canned tuna fish is a regular snack, even dinner item in many houses as it’s easy to use and absolutely delicious to taste as well. If you are wondering how healthy this tuna fish is, you must know that it has a host of health benefits.

Tuna fish is usually canned in either oil or water, and that is how it is widely available. It quite affordable as well. Health Shots got in touch with internal medicine specialist Dr Suchismitha Rajamanya to understand the nutritional value of tuna fish and how it helps our body. So read on to find out why you must include tuna fish in your daily diet.

Is tuna fish healthy?

There are many health benefits of eating fish, and tuna is no exception. Besides being tasty and easy to use, tuna fish is actually quite healthy as well. “Tuna is a rich source of protein, omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin D, and several essential minerals. While it is commonly available in canned form, fresh tuna steaks are also popular and offer a different culinary experience,” explains Dr Rajamanya.

The benefits of including tuna in your diet include:

1. High protein content

The protein content in tuna fish is quite high. This makes it a very easy food option that supports muscle health.

2. Contains omega-3 fatty acids

Tuna fish contains omega-3 fatty acids. These can contribute to heart health and may reduce inflammation as well, making it very healthy.

Also Read: 5 health benefits of Basa fish you must know!

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3. Rich source of Vitamin D

Tuna fish is a rich source of vitamin D which is essential for our bodies. The vitamin D in tuna fish aids in bone health and immune function.

Tuna fish is a rich source of vitamin D. Image Courtesy: Shutterstock

What are the likely side effects of eating Tuna?

Nothing in excess is good, and that includes your can of tuna fish as well. There are some elements in this fish that can contribute to worsening certain conditions and should be avoided. “The potential downsides of consuming tuna include its mercury content, which can be harmful in excessive amounts. Pregnant women and young children should be cautious due to the risk of mercury toxicity,” explains Dr Rajamanya.

When consuming tuna, be mindful of your mercury intake. Limiting the frequency of high-mercury fish consumption is crucial, especially for vulnerable populations like pregnant women. So instead, you can try to opt for smaller tuna species, like skipjack, which tend to have lower mercury levels. Also, while omega-3 fatty acids, which are found in tuna, are great for your body, they do have some side effects as well.

A pregnant woman with a bowl of food.
Pregnant women should avoid eating tuna. Image Courtesy: Adobe Stock

How to include Tuna fish in your diet?

Be it salads, sandwiches or steaks, there are various ways of including tuna fish in your daily diet. However, are you wondering how much tuna can you eat in one day? Well, Dr Rajamanya explains, “The recommended dose of tuna is about 170g of light can tuna per week for people less than 50kgs; for people more than that, they can use 2 cans.”

Tuna fish can make for a good snack, especially when you want to load up on your protein content for the day. Adding canned tuna to salads for a quick protein boost is a must-try option for all fitness-lovers. Well, if you are not the snack-types, and are looking for healthy ways to include tuna fish into your main course dishes, then grilling fresh tuna steaks with herbs and spices can be a yummy addition to your menus.

Additionally, tuna fish is a great breakfast, as well as a to-go option. So be is packing lunches for school or office, tuna can be a great addition to your boxes. Making tuna sandwiches with whole-grain bread and adding vegetables for added nutrients, is also a great way to load up on nutrition as well as taste.

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